$47.00!
What the pharmacist told me when I picked up my prescription.
I blurted out, “Are you kidding?”

I’ve never spent more than $6.00 in my life for lotions or pills.
$47.00?
“Sorry. I don’t want that.”
I left w/o the lotion that would [might] cure the 2” square rough patches that showed up, one on each hip.
Eventually, lab results came back: allergic to one of my waistbands.
Will test for allergies.

Meanwhile, got to thinking about that prescription (which the doctor, on hearing of my reaction from either the pharmacist, unlikely, or nurse, sympathetic to my scandal, rewrote, by the way, something for $6.00,) which seems to be working.
 
But back to that prescription.
And I know that many people have to pay that and a lot more for their absolutely necessary medications.
That’s sad.  Very.

But my point is this: does anyone think that they can blithely write a prescription, hand it over to a patient, and not say, “This may be a little expensive?”
Do you live on my planet?
Don’t you ask, “Can you afford this?”
Don’t you say, “This is a little expensive. But it’s the strongest; the most expensive. But if that is difficult for you to pay, there are others less expensive that we can try?”

I mean, does a doctor’s duty end at diagnosing a problem and writing a prescription?
Does ‘holistic’ not come into play here?
Money.
Affordability.
Head in the sand, anyone?
$47.00!

It’s the melatonin syndrome all over again.
For decades complaining of difficulty getting to sleep.
And not once, not one single professional, not a nurse, not a GP, not a psychiatrist ever mentioned the simplest and most natural possibility: “Your body may not be producing enough melatonin.
Let’s try it for $6.00.”

$47.00.
Melatonin, again.
Instead of simple, a solution fraught with some difficulty: cost.
Stop it!
You are just another player, not a false god aloof from all other aspects of life.
Like limited dollars.
Like simple cures as the first to try.

Damn it!
When handing out tickets that cost money, know that your patient has limited monies.
All patients.
Stop it.
Stop not thinking holistically.