The Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary by Giotto, in the Scrovegni Chapel Padua, Italy (circa 1305)

The Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary
by Giotto, in the Scrovegni Chapel
Padua, Italy (circa 1305)

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Thursday, April 11, 2019
We are so goldarn selfish.

Really.
A child is born and what do we see?
A child?
A life?

No! We don’t see that.
We see life eternal for ourselves.
We get to live for a handful more decades after our body fails us.

Think I’m joking?
Being extreme?

How many times have our children or grandchildren done something that brings back memories?
That cause us to say, “Oh, she reminds me so much of (fill in the blank.)

But that selfishness a good thing.
Because it’s not preservation of the species that drives us, it’s perpetualization of ourselves.
And if, by chance, that self-perpetualization aids the rest of the species, well, good for them.

We are so goldarn selfish.

The next seven days will see 5 days in the fifties, one day of fortyish and one day in the sixties. The Boston Marathon Monday a cool 48* with rain.  Remember that it’s springtime according to our own calendar. Starting April 7, extending to June 15.  Tick Tock. In clock language:   Enjoy today. Enjoy the week.

The next seven days will see 5 days in the fifties, one day of fortyish and one day in the sixties.
The Boston Marathon Monday a cool 48* with rain.

Remember that it’s springtime according to our own calendar. Starting April 7, extending to June 15.

Tick Tock.
In clock language:

Enjoy today.
Enjoy the week.

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Postings Count, Weather Brief, and Dinner

Thursday, April 11, 2019

My 370th consecutive posting, committed to 5,000.
After 370 posts we’re at the 7.40% mark of my commitment, the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.

On Thursday, Boston’s temperature will reach a high of 50* with a feels-like temperature of 48* under sunny skies,

Dinner of Short Ribs and cabbage.






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Question of the Day:
Who was Amelia Earhart?

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Thursday, April 11, 2019

Love your notes.
Contact me at domcapossela@hotmail.com

This from Anne McEvoy Kilzer:

Dear Dom-

Gary and I can not thank you enough for such a wonderful time.  Everything was great- the company, your amzing food, meeting new people and seeing you, Kay and Dave.

Thank you so much for including us!!

Love,

Anne xoxo

__________________________________
and this from Gary Kilzer:

To a great host, raconteur and f’ing good cook nice party thanks for including us

All the best

G

And Gary sends this photograph of the Dry-Aged Tomahawk Steak:

Notice in the slow roast the meat is cooked evenly throughout. So tender and juicy it will stay memorable in our minds.

Notice in the slow roast the meat is cooked evenly throughout.
So tender and juicy it will stay memorable in our minds.

Web Meister Responds: Everybody loves Anne and Gary. With good reason: they are amiable, gentlefolk.

“And third, there are some things even a rat won't do."

“And third, there are some things even a rat won't do."

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Chuckle of the Day
:
At a convention of biological scientists, one researcher remarks to another, "Did you know that in our lab we have switched from mice to lawyers for our experiments?"
"Really? Why did you switch?"
"Well, for three reasons.
“First we found that lawyers are far more plentiful.
“Second, the lab assistants don't get attached to lawyers.
“And third, there are some things even a rat won't do."

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Answer to the Question of the Day:
Who was Amelia Earhart?

Amelia Earhart standing under nose of her Lockheed Model 10-E Electra. Gelatin silver print, 1937. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution;  gift of George R. Rinhart, in memory of Joan Rinhart Underwood & Underwood (active 1880 – c. 1950)[1] - http://amextbg2.wgbhdigital.org/wgbh/americanexperience/media/uploads/special_features/photo_gallery/amelia_gallery_07.jpg

Amelia Earhart standing under nose of her Lockheed Model 10-E Electra. Gelatin silver print, 1937. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution;
gift of George R. Rinhart, in memory of Joan Rinhart
Underwood & Underwood (active 1880 – c. 1950)[1] - http://amextbg2.wgbhdigital.org/wgbh/americanexperience/media/uploads/special_features/photo_gallery/amelia_gallery_07.jpg

Amelia Mary Earhart (born July 24, 1897; disappeared July 2, 1937) was an American aviation pioneer and author.
Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
She received the United States Distinguished Flying Cross for this accomplishment.
She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots.
In 1935, Earhart became a visiting faculty member at Purdue University as an advisor to aeronautical engineering and a career counselor to women students.
She was also a member of the National Woman's Party and an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment.

During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10-E Electra, Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island.
Fascination with her life, career, and disappearance continues to this day.

I keep my family tree in here. I look at it from time to time to remind me that I am carrying on their lives, goals, values.

I keep my family tree in here.
I look at it from time to time to remind me that I am carrying on their lives, goals, values.

____________________________________________________
Good Morning on this Thursday, the Eleventh Day of April.

Today we talked about self-perpetualization, about the weather, the new spring calendar, and dinner, short ribs and cabbage..
We posted a new chuckle, lab rats and lawyers, letters from the Kilzers, Anne and Gary, and a brief bio on Amelia Earhart.
 
And now? Gotta go.

Che vuoi? Le pocketbook?

See you soon.

Your Love