I grew up with a gang of these guys. We encouraged each other’s insanity. And we were good at it.

I grew up with a gang of these guys.
We encouraged each other’s insanity.
And we were good at it.

Posted on Sunday, Jan 27
Jolted from a nap by a voice saying, “Do it, and wash away mankind’s…”
Looking around.
Sunrise – the sun focusing its blinding brightness through my window into my eyes.
Looked away.
Got slowly to my feet.

Finish the sentence.
Wash away mankind’s, sins?
Likely.

Thinking Robert DeNiro: “You talking to me?”
But not talking to me, surely.
I need a personal flood to wash away my own sins.

“Do it and…”
What?
Flagellation? Crown of thorns? Cruci…
That’s being done to.

“Do it, and wash away mankind’s…”
Someone else’s conversation?
Hearing voices?
Maybe.
Maybe. Plenty of other weird stuff has happened to me.

Why the fuss?
A lovely nap interrupted by a boss.
Never worked for a boss.
Well, hardly ever.
Point being, I don’t like being told what to do, let alone while being rudely roused.

“Do it, and wash away mankind’s…”
Driving me crazy.
Haunting me.

Maybe telling me I am boring.
I lack things to think about.
To worry about.
Look, I’m permitting a meaningless snippet of a non-existent conversation to plague me.
How dull is that?

“Do it, and wash away mankind’s…”

290 posts to date. Today we’re at the 5.80% mark of my commitment, the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.  5,000 posts will take 13.69 years, taking me to a new phase of my life. Will see thirteen more  Blog’s Winter Calendars, Jan2 to Feb13.   Tick Tock. In clock language: Enjoy today.

290 posts to date.
Today we’re at the 5.80% mark of my commitment,
the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.

5,000 posts will take 13.69 years, taking me to a new phase of my life.
Will see thirteen more Blog’s Winter Calendars, Jan2 to Feb13.

Tick Tock.
In clock language: Enjoy today.

 _________________________
Tagging Today

Sunday, January 27, 2019
My 290th consecutive posting, committed to 5,000.
Time is 12.01am.
On Sunday, Boston’s temperature will reach a high of 41* with a feels-like temperature of 34.
With flurries likely.

Then we have three typical days of winter [mid-thirties] followed by some cold and very cold weather.
Meanwhile, the calendar pages are turning, twenty days left to the end of the Blog’s Winter Calendar, Jan2 to Feb13.

Dinner is  haddock in a curry-saffron sauce.




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Question of the Day:
January 27
What is Cassoulet?

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Short takes: City Life
Thousands of people filled Boston Common for the Boston Women's March for America on Saturday, January 19, 2019, with a focus on re-energizing, re-committing, and doubling down on following through with their work toward change, from civil rights to religious freedom to racial and economic justice.
From the left, we see the women marching to the site of the rally, the outskirts of the gathering, and, in the second from the far right, note a much smaller event, giving away clothing to the homeless or just cold, and on the far right, a shot of the rally.

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Answer to Question of the Day:
January 27
What is Cassoulet?

Cassoulet with Sausages We here prefer a variety of meats, including duck pieces seared in goose or duck fat.

Cassoulet with Sausages
We here prefer a variety of meats, including duck pieces seared in goose or duck fat.

Unctuous.

Unctuous.

Cassoulet is a rich, slow-cooked casserole containing meat (typically pork sausages, goose, duck and sometimes mutton), pork skin, and white beans.

The dish originated in the south of France.
It is named after its traditional cooking vessel, the cassole, a deep, round, earthenware pot with slanting sides.
The traditional homeland of cassoulet is the region once known as the province of Languedoc, especially the towns of Toulouse, Carcassonne, and Castelnaudary, that claims to be where the dish originated.
The brotherhood of Cassoulet, "La Grande Confrérie du Cassoulet de Castelnaudary", has organized competitions and fairs about cassoulet every year since 1999.

In France, cassoulets of varying price and quality are also sold in cans and jars in supermarkets, grocery stores and charcuteries.
The cheapest ones contain only beans, tomato sauce, sausages, and bacon.
More expensive versions are likely to be cooked with goose fat and to include Toulouse sausages, lamb, goose, or duck confit.

Nice. Can use the addition of a green; not traditional but terrific. Arugula stirred in near the end of the cook is a good choice,

Nice.
Can use the addition of a green; not traditional but terrific.
Arugula stirred in near the end of the cook is a good choice,

Haute cuisine versions require mixing pre-cooked roasted meats with beans that have been simmered separately with aromatic vegetables, but this runs counter to cassoulet's peasant origins.

In the process of preparing the dish it is traditional to deglaze the pot from the previous cassoulet in order to give a base for the next one.
This has led to stories, such as the one given by Elizabeth David, citing Anatole France, of a single original cassoulet being extended for years or even decades.

In U.S. restaurants, the term cassoulet is often applied to any hearty bean-based casserole, with variations such as salmon cassoulet.

Web Meister discloses that our own recipe follows the Haute Cuisine version.

I have a tape recorder for the next time I hear voices that aren’t whispering sweet nothings.

I have a tape recorder for the next time I hear voices that aren’t whispering sweet nothings.

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Good morning on this Sunday, January 27
We talked about voices, as in hearing them.
About winter speeding past including a warning of dropping temperatures three days hence.
We saw some photos of Boston Women's March for America that took place on Saturday, the 19th of January.
And we talked about cassoulet.

Time to go.

Che vuoi? Le pocketbook?

See you soon.

Love

Dom