Okay. I accept it. But go! winter. Go!

Okay.
I accept it.
But go! winter. Go!

_____________________
Sunday, March 24, 2019

The early morning wind made Saturday’s walkabout particularly unpleasant.
The temperatures were no colder than the months of winter we’ve just been through.
And I was perfectly dressed for the cold.

Nonetheless, it was unpleasant.
I think that, despite the crutch of seeing this as the ‘shoulder season,’ the winter is beginner to feel endless to me; it’s wearing me down; making me disgruntled; unhappy.

True, the forecast is for warmer weather, even 60* weather very soon.
Also true, I almost made it through the shoulder season without complaint.
I would have counted myself as indeed stoic had I been able to get through just this one last day of cold without complaining.

But one more day was one day too many.
Winter, you are no longer tolerable.
You’ve got to go.
Just go.

I wrote these words at 8.00am when it was indeed uncomfortable.
But on the return walk home at noon, the warm spring sun had broken through the clouds and made it a wonderful day to be out.
The puckish spring pushed me over the line of winter-tolerance.
Just a few more hours and I’d have made it through the winter without complaint.
And now it’s gone until next year.

Damn! Damn! Damn! Damn!
I’ve grown accustomed to her face.

______________________________
Postings Count, Weather Brief, and Dinner

Sunday, March 24, 2019

Dinner of Goose and Sprouts wraps. An excellent way to use leftovers.

Dinner of Goose and Sprouts wraps.
An excellent way to use leftovers.

My 346th consecutive posting, committed to 5,000.

Time is 12.01am.
On Sunday Boston’s temperature will reach a high of 54* with a feels-like temperature of 50* under sunny skies.





Tick Tock : Marking Calendars and Deep Weather   After 346 posts we’re at the 6.92% mark of my commitment, the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.  Spring has arrived.  Enjoy.

Tick Tock : Marking Calendars and Deep Weather

After 346 posts we’re at the 6.92% mark of my commitment, the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.

Spring has arrived.

Enjoy.


_____________________
Question of the Day:

What is the hot dog?

Retirement puts the truth to the saying that a change is as good as a rest.

Retirement puts the truth to the saying that a change is as good as a rest.

______________________
Love your notes.
Contact me at domcapossela@hotmail.com

This from Marc O responding to the post which encouraged a focus on relieving early morning stress:

Wow,

If handling stress was as simple as giving yourself more time in the morning, I’d still be working now.
May I suggest retirement, if doable, as a more effective means of coping with stress.
But beware!
All through my working career (45+ years) I suffered stress dreams that were school related. Now, in retirement, I suffer work related stress dreams.

When will they end?

M.

Web Meister responds: I, too, am greatly enjoying retirement. But note, Marc, you have an important and exciting retirement activity in your writing, as I have in my blog. God bless us both.

__________________
Chuckle of the day

A lady goes to her parish priest one day and tells him, "Father, I have a problem. I have two female parrots but they only know how to say one thing."

"What do they say?" the priest inquired.

"They say, 'Hi, we're prostitutes. Do you want to have some fun?'" the embarrassed woman said.

"That's obscene!" the priest exclaimed, "I can see why you’re embarrassed."

He thought a minute and said, "You know, I may have a solution to this problem. I have two male parrots whom I have taught to pray and read the Bible. Bring your two parrots over to my house and we will put them in the cage with Francis and Job. My parrots can teach your parrots to praise and worship. I'm sure your parrots will stop saying that...that phrase in no time."

"Thank you," the lady responded, "this may very well be the solution."

The next day, she brought her female parrots to the priest's house.
As he ushered her in, she saw his two male parrots were inside their cage, holding their rosary beads and praying.

Finally, one male parrot looked over at the other male parrot and said, "Put the beads away, Francis, our prayers have been answered!"

Finally, one male parrot looked over at the other male parrot and said, "Put the beads away, Francis, our prayers have been answered!"

Impressed, she walked over and placed her parrots in with them.
After just a couple of seconds, the female parrots exclaimed out in unison, "Hi, we're prostitutes. Do you want to have some fun?"
There was a stunned silence.

Finally, one male parrot looked over at the other male parrot and said, "Put the beads away, Francis, our prayers have been answered!"

Backroads & Detours

by Howard Dinin

Mindful Quotidian

The tourist parking lot at the foot of our village (that is, out of sight), looking west (of course). Those hills in the distance are about 15 miles away, and count as mountains. The bigger tree to the right of the one in the center is obscuring a view of Mont Ste.-Victoire, which is about 30 miles away, and the subject of over a hundred paintings by Paul Cézanne, arguably the painter who had more influence on the early development of what we now consider modernist painting than any other (yes, including PP). This landscape is utterly changed now, more than a dozen years later. The lampposts are gone – stolen mysteriously one night and never recovered, and a much heavier growth of trees and shrubs allowed to grow to the height of those lights. The vagaries of life in the 21st century are another reason to be always mindful of capturing what you may never see again.

The tourist parking lot at the foot of our village (that is, out of sight), looking west (of course). Those hills in the distance are about 15 miles away, and count as mountains. The bigger tree to the right of the one in the center is obscuring a view of Mont Ste.-Victoire, which is about 30 miles away, and the subject of over a hundred paintings by Paul Cézanne, arguably the painter who had more influence on the early development of what we now consider modernist painting than any other (yes, including PP).
This landscape is utterly changed now, more than a dozen years later. The lampposts are gone – stolen mysteriously one night and never recovered, and a much heavier growth of trees and shrubs allowed to grow to the height of those lights. The vagaries of life in the 21st century are another reason to be always mindful of capturing what you may never see again.

And, yes, I know that it’s a sunset, and a sunset is a gimme’… But how many sunsets are you going to see at dinnertime in the south of France, heading out to eat the night before Hallowe’en, and eager for some French food? Point is, you stop, you take your time (the restaurateur is not going to be in a hurry—not an American hurry), you get out your camera (the one used to shoot this weighs about four-and-a-half pounds) and you carefully compose your shot, while calculating how to expose it. You don’t have another 30 seconds?

___________________________________
Answer to the Question of the Day:

What is the hot dog?

The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a partially sliced hot dog bun, a bun of size and shape to hold the sausage.

A cooked hot dog in a bun with mustard, relish, and ketchup Hot Dog Evan Swigart from Chicago, USA - Hot


A cooked hot dog in a bun with mustard, relish, and ketchup
Hot Dog
Evan Swigart from Chicago, USA - Hot

Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives.

A corn dog (also spelled corndog) is a sausage (usually a hot dog) on a stick that has been coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter and deep fried.  It originated in the United States and is commonly found in American cuisine. A hand-dipped corn dog on a stick, served from a traveling food vendor trailer at Rochesterfest in Rochester, Minnesota  Jonathunder - Own work

A corn dog (also spelled corndog) is a sausage (usually a hot dog) on a stick that has been coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter and deep fried.
It originated in the United States and is commonly found in American cuisine.
A hand-dipped corn dog on a stick, served from a traveling food vendor trailer at Rochesterfest in Rochester, Minnesota

Jonathunder - Own work

Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket.





Pigs in a blanket (also pig in a blanket) is a variety of different sausage-based foods in the United Kingdom, United States, Denmark, Republic of Ireland, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Canada, and Japan.  The sausage center varies depending on geographic location (e.g Cumberland is a favored variety in the UK while it is virtually unknown in the USA). Geography also dominates the form of the ‘blanket’ with bacon being the most common choice in the UK, while Americans choose pastry.  Many are large, but other recipes call for a dish that can be eaten in one or two bites.  For this reason, they are commonly served as an appetizer or hors d'oeuvre, or are accompanied by other items during the main course.  A small bite-sized form is a common hors d'oeuvre served at cocktail parties and is often accompanied by a mustard or aioli dipping sauce. inline  Photo credit: stef yau - This image originally posted to Flickr

Pigs in a blanket (also pig in a blanket) is a variety of different sausage-based foods in the United Kingdom, United States, Denmark, Republic of Ireland, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Canada, and Japan.
The sausage center varies depending on geographic location (e.g Cumberland is a favored variety in the UK while it is virtually unknown in the USA). Geography also dominates the form of the ‘blanket’ with bacon being the most common choice in the UK, while Americans choose pastry.

Many are large, but other recipes call for a dish that can be eaten in one or two bites.
For this reason, they are commonly served as an appetizer or hors d'oeuvre, or are accompanied by other items during the main course.

A small bite-sized form is a common hors d'oeuvre served at cocktail parties and is often accompanied by a mustard or aioli dipping sauce.
inline

Photo credit: stef yau - This image originally posted to Flickr

The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and became popular in the United States, where the "hot dog" became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts.
The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture.

Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of other regional cuisines, including notably Chicago street cuisine.

I definitely didn’t dress properly for Saturday’s cold blast. My legs are both goose-bumped all over. Not very attractive to the touch.

I definitely didn’t dress properly for Saturday’s cold blast.
My legs are both goose-bumped all over.
Not very attractive to the touch.

______________________
Good Morning on this Sunday, the Twenty-Fourth Day of March

Today we talked about one winter’s day too many.
We talked about the weather and calendar and decided on a goose wrap for dinner.
We posted a comment from Marc O regarding stress.
We retold a parrot joke.
We hosted another lovely entry from the Mindful Quotidian.
And, finally, we presented the hot dog and its variants.
 
And now? Gotta go.
Che vuoi? Le pocketbook?

See you soon.

Your Love