Something that we think is a small project, a new sink for the sixty-year-old house, becomes a major project because of any combination of hundreds of reasons an old house presents us, from rotted floor boards to rusted out pipes to code violations.
So it was when I searched for a real life Hannibal Lecter.

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Tagging Today
Sunday, October 14, 2018
My 187th consecutive posting.
Time is 4.52am.
Boston’s temperature will reach 60*
and it will be sunny.

Dinner is with my daughter, cousin, and friend and will be Linguini Marinara and Roast Chicken.

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Question of the Day?
”What is “Hannibal Rising?”

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Hints:

Left:
Theodore John Kaczynski (born May 22, 1942), also known as the Unabomber, is an American domestic terrorist, former mathematics professor, and anarchist author.
A mathematics prodigy, he abandoned an academic career in 1969 to pursue a primitive lifestyle.
Then, between 1978 and 1995, he killed three people and injured 23 others in an attempt to start a revolution by conducting a nationwide bombing campaign targeting people involved with modern technology.
In conjunction, he issued a social critique opposing industrialization and advancing a nature-centered form of anarchism.

2nd from left:
“Girl who kicked the Hornet’s Nest” is the third in the Millennium series following Lisbeth Salander as she traces a series of grotesque murders occurring over decades.

2nd from right:
Gary Michael Heidnik (November 22, 1943 – July 6, 1999) was an American murderer who kidnapped, tortured, and raped six African-American women, killing two of them, while holding them prisoner in a pit in his basement in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Heidnik was sentenced to death and executed by lethal injection in July 1999.

Far right:
Jeffrey Lionel Dahmer (May 21, 1960 – November 28, 1994), also known as the Milwaukee Cannibal or the Milwaukee Monster, was an American serial killer and sex offender, who committed the rape, murder, and dismemberment of 17 men and boys from 1978 to 1991.
Many of his later murders involved necrophilia, cannibalism, and the permanent preservation of body parts — typically all or part of the skeleton.

Although diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, schizotypal personality disorder, and a psychotic disorder, Dahmer was found to be legally sane at his trial.
Convicted of 15 of the 16 murders he had committed in Wisconsin, Dahmer was sentenced to 15 terms of life imprisonment on February 15, 1992.

On November 28, 1994, Dahmer was beaten to death by Christopher Scarver, a fellow inmate at the Columbia Correctional Institution.

Far Left:
Theodore Robert Bundy (born Theodore Robert Cowell; November 24, 1946 – January 24, 1989) was an American serial killer, kidnapper, rapist, burglar, and necrophile who assaulted and murdered numerous young women and girls during the 1970s and possibly earlier.
Shortly before his execution and after more than a decade of denials, he confessed to 30 homicides that he committed in seven states between 1974 and 1978. The true victim count is unknown and could be much higher.

Many of Bundy's young female victims regarded him as handsome and charismatic, which were traits that he exploited to win their trust.
He would typically approach them in public places, feigning injury or disability, or impersonating an authority figure, before overpowering and assaulting them at more secluded locations.
He sometimes revisited his secondary crime scenes for hours at a time, grooming and performing sexual acts with the decomposing corpses until putrefaction and destruction by wild animals made further interaction impossible.
He decapitated at least 12 of his victims, and for a period of time, he kept some of the severed heads as mementos in his apartment.
On a few occasions, he simply broke into dwellings at night and bludgeoned his victims as they slept.

In 1975, Bundy went to jail for the first time when he was incarcerated in Utah for aggravated kidnapping and attempted criminal assault.
He then became a suspect in a progressively longer list of unsolved homicides in multiple states.
Facing murder charges in Colorado, he engineered two dramatic escapes and committed further assaults, including three murders, before his ultimate recapture in Florida in 1978.
For the Florida homicides, he received three death sentences in two separate trials.

Bundy was executed in the electric chair at Florida State Prison on January 24, 1989.
Biographer Ann Rule described him as "a sadistic sociopath who took pleasure from another human's pain and the control he had over his victims, to the point of death, and even after".
He once called himself "the most cold-hearted son of a bitch you'll ever meet".
Attorney Polly Nelson—a member of his last defense team—wrote: "Ted was the very definition of heartless evil.”

Second from left:
Josef Mengele (16 March 1911 – 7 February 1979) was a German Schutzstaffel (SS) officer and physician in Auschwitz concentration camp during World War II.
He performed deadly human experiments on prisoners and was a member of the team of doctors who selected victims to be killed in the gas chambers.
Arrivals deemed able to work were admitted into the camp, and those deemed unfit for labor were immediately killed in the gas chambers.

With Red Army troops sweeping through Poland, Mengele was transferred 280 kilometers (170 mi) from Auschwitz to the Gross-Rosen concentration camp on 17 January 1945, just 10 days before the arrival of the Soviet forces at Auschwitz.
After the war, he fled to South America where he evaded capture for the rest of his life.

Mengele received doctorates in anthropology and medicine from Munich University and began a career as a researcher.
He joined the Nazi Party in 1937 and the SS in 1938.
He was assigned as a battalion medical officer at the start of World War II, then transferred to the Nazi concentration camps service in early 1943 and assigned to Auschwitz.

There he saw the opportunity to conduct genetic research on human subjects.
His subsequent experiments focused primarily on twins but had no regard for the health or safety of the victims.

Mengele sailed to Argentina in July 1949, assisted by a network of former SS members.
He initially lived in and around Buenos Aires, then fled to Paraguay in 1959 and Brazil in 1960 while being sought by West Germany, Israel, and Nazi hunters such as Simon Wiesenthal so that he could be brought to trial.
He eluded capture in spite of extradition requests by the West German government and clandestine operations by the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad.
He drowned after suffering a stroke while swimming off the Brazilian coast in 1979 and was buried under a false name.
His remains were disinterred and positively identified by forensic examination in 1985.

Second from right:
Edward Theodore Gein (August 27, 1906[5] – July 26, 1984), also known as The Butcher of Plainfield, was an American murderer and body snatcher.
His crimes, committed around his hometown of Plainfield, Wisconsin, gathered widespread notoriety after authorities discovered that Gein had exhumed corpses from local graveyards and fashioned trophies and keepsakes from their bones and skin.
Gein confessed to killing two women – tavern owner Mary Hogan in 1954, and a Plainfield hardware store owner, Bernice Worden in 1957.
Gein was initially found unfit to stand trial and confined to a mental health facility.
In 1968, Gein was found guilty but legally insane of the murder of Worden, and was remanded to a psychiatric institution.
He died at Mendota Mental Health Institute of cancer-induced liver and respiratory failure at age 77 on July 26, 1984. He is buried next to his family in the Plainfield Cemetery, in a now-unmarked grave.

Far Right:
Earle Leonard Nelson (née Ferral; May 12, 1897 – January 13, 1928), also known in the media as the "Gorilla Man," the "Gorilla Killer," and the "Dark Strangler," was an American serial killer, rapist, and necrophile.
He was the first known American serial sex murderer of the twentieth century.

Born and raised in San Francisco, California by his devoutly Pentecostal grandmother, Nelson exhibited bizarre behavior as a child, which was compounded by head injuries he sustained in a bicycling accident at age ten.
After committing various minor offenses in early adulthood, he was institutionalized in Napa for a time.

Nelson began committing numerous rapes and murders in February 1926, primarily in the West Coast cities of San Francisco and Portland, Oregon.
In late 1926, he moved east, committing multiple rapes and murders in several Midwestern and East Coast cities before moving north into Canada, raping and killing a teenage girl in Winnipeg, Manitoba. After committing his second murder in Winnipeg, he was arrested by Canadian authorities and convicted of both murders, and sentenced to death.
He was executed by hanging in Winnipeg in 1928.

In undertaking his crimes, Nelson had a cunning modus operandi: Most of his victims were middle-aged landladies, many of whom he would find through "room for rent" advertisements.
Posing as a mild-mannered and charming Christian drifter, Nelson used the pretext of renting a room in the landladies' boardinghouses to make contact with them before attacking.
Each of his victims were killed via strangulation, and many were raped after death.
His penultimate victim, a 14-year-old girl named Lola Cowan, was the only known victim to be significantly mutilated after death.

Nelson's crime spree, which consists of 22 known murders, made him the most prolific serial killer in American history until the discovery of Dean Corll's crimes in 1973, and was a source of inspiration for Alfred Hitchcock's 1943 film Shadow of a Doubt.

Far left:
Hamilton Howard "Albert" Fish (May 19, 1870 – January 16, 1936) was an American serial killer. He was also known as the Gray Man, the Werewolf of Wysteria, the Brooklyn Vampire, the Moon Maniac, and The Boogey Man.

A child rapist and cannibal, he boasted that he "had children in every state", and at one time stated the number was about 100.
However, it is not known whether he was referring to rapes or cannibalization, nor is it known if the statement was truthful.

He was a suspect in at least five murders during his lifetime.
Fish confessed to three murders that police were able to trace to a known homicide, and he confessed to stabbing at least two other people.
He was put on trial for the kidnapping and murder of Grace Budd, and was convicted and executed by electric chair.

His crimes were dramatized in the 2007 film The Gray Man, starring Patrick Bauchau as Fish.

Second from left:
Béla Kiss (28 July 1877 – 19?) was a Hungarian serial killer.
He is thought to have murdered at least 23 young women and one man, and attempted to pickle their bodies in giant metal drums that he kept on his property.

Second from right is Micajah; on Far right is Wiley
Micajah "Big" Harpe, born Joshua Harper (before 1768 – August 1799), and Wiley "Little" Harpe, born William Harper (before 1770 – February 8, 1804), were murderers, highwaymen, and river pirates who operated in Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and Mississippi in the late 18th century.
They are often considered the earliest documented serial killers in the United States, reckoned from the colonial era forward.

Loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolution, the Harpes became outlaws after the war and began robbing and killing settlers in the remote frontier west of the Appalachian Mountains.
They are believed to have killed thirty-nine people, and possibly as many as fifty.

As the Harpes' crimes gained notoriety, vigilante groups formed to avenge their victims, and they were eventually tracked down and executed around the turn of the century.
Their legendary savagery has since entered American folklore, appearing to have been motivated more by blood lust than financial gain.

Below:
Elizabeth Bathory

Countess Elizabeth Báthory de Ecsed (7 August 1560 – 21 August 1614) was a Hungarian noblewoman and alleged serial killer from the noble family of Báthory, who owned land in the Kingdom of Hungary (now Hungary, Slovakia and Romania).    She has been labeled by Guinness World Records as the most prolific female murderer, though the precise number of her victims is debated.  Báthory and four collaborators were accused of torturing and killing hundreds of young women between 1585 and 1609.   Despite the evidence against Elizabeth, her family's influence kept her from facing trial.  She was imprisoned in December 1610 within Čachtice Castle, in Upper Hungary (now Slovakia), and held in solitary confinement in a windowless room until her death four years later.   The stories of her serial murders and brutality are verified by the testimony of more than 300 witnesses and survivors as well as physical evidence and the presence of horribly mutilated dead, dying and imprisoned girls found at the time of her arrest. Stories describing her vampire-like tendencies (most famously the tale that she bathed in the blood of virgins to retain her youth) were generally recorded years after her death, and are considered unreliable.   Her story quickly became part of national folklore, and her infamy persists to this day. She is often compared to Vlad the Impaler of Wallachia (on whom the fictional Count Dracula is partly based); some insist she inspired Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897), though there is no evidence to support this theory. having contributed some of the mythos to the Dracula legend herself. Nicknames and literary epithets attributed to her include The Blood Countess and Countess Dracula.

Countess Elizabeth Báthory de Ecsed (7 August 1560 – 21 August 1614) was a Hungarian noblewoman and alleged serial killer from the noble family of Báthory, who owned land in the Kingdom of Hungary (now Hungary, Slovakia and Romania).

She has been labeled by Guinness World Records as the most prolific female murderer, though the precise number of her victims is debated.
Báthory and four collaborators were accused of torturing and killing hundreds of young women between 1585 and 1609.

Despite the evidence against Elizabeth, her family's influence kept her from facing trial.
She was imprisoned in December 1610 within Čachtice Castle, in Upper Hungary (now Slovakia), and held in solitary confinement in a windowless room until her death four years later.

The stories of her serial murders and brutality are verified by the testimony of more than 300 witnesses and survivors as well as physical evidence and the presence of horribly mutilated dead, dying and imprisoned girls found at the time of her arrest.
Stories describing her vampire-like tendencies (most famously the tale that she bathed in the blood of virgins to retain her youth) were generally recorded years after her death, and are considered unreliable.

Her story quickly became part of national folklore, and her infamy persists to this day.
She is often compared to Vlad the Impaler of Wallachia (on whom the fictional Count Dracula is partly based); some insist she inspired Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897), though there is no evidence to support this theory. having contributed some of the mythos to the Dracula legend herself. Nicknames and literary epithets attributed to her include The Blood Countess and Countess Dracula.

hannibal rising poster for book.png


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Answer to “What is “Hannibal Rising?
It’s the chronologically-first novel in the Hannibal Lecter series, telling the origins of the psychopathic Hannibal Lecter.

Thomas Harris wrote this as a prequel to the Silence of the Lambs after film producer Dino De Laurentiis (who owned the cinematic rights to the Lecter character) announced that he was going to make a film depicting Lecter's childhood and development into a serial killer with or without Harris' help.

The novel chronicles Lecter's early life, from birth into an aristocratic family in Lithuania in 1933, to being orphaned, along with his beloved sister Mischa, in 1944 when a German Stuka bomber attacks a Soviet tank in front of their forest hideaway.

Shortly thereafter, he and Mischa are captured by a band of Nazi collaborators, who murder and cannibalize Mischa before her brother's eyes; Lecter later learns that the collaborators also fed him Mischa's remains.

Irreparably traumatized, Lecter escapes from the deserters and wanders through the forest, dazed and unable to speak.

He is found and taken in by an orphanage, where he is bullied by the other children and abused by the dean.

He is adopted by his uncle Robert and his Japanese wife, Lady Murasaki, who nurses him back to health and teaches him to speak again.

After his uncle's death, Lecter forms a close, pseudo-romantic relationship with his step-aunt. During this time he also shows great intellectual aptitude, entering medical school at a young age and distinguishing himself.

Despite his seemingly comfortable life, Lecter is consumed by a savage obsession with avenging Mischa's death. He kills for the first time as a teenager, beheading a racist fishmonger who insulted Murasaki. He then methodically tracks down, tortures, and murders each of the men who had killed his sister. In the process of taking his revenge, he forsakes his relationship with Murasaki and seemingly loses all traces of his humanity.

The novel ends with Lecter being accepted to the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

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Good Morning.
Hate to start the day with a bunch of sickos but once I got the research started I couldn’t quit.

I’d like to leave you with something uplifting.

Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the first candle will not be shortened.   Happiness never decreases by being shared.

Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the first candle will not be shortened.

Happiness never decreases by being shared.