Acoma Pueblo is a Native American pueblo approximately 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico in the United States.
Four villages make up Acoma Pueblo: Sky City (Old Acoma), Acomita, Anzac, and McCartys.

The Acoma Pueblo tribe is a federally recognized tribal entity.
The historical land of Acoma Pueblo totaled roughly 5,000,000 acres.
The community retains only 10% of this land, making up the Acoma Indian Reservation.

Acoma Pueblo is a National Historic Landmark.

According to the 2010 United States Census, 4,989 people identified as Acoma.
The Acoma have continuously occupied the area for over 2000 years, making this one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the United States (along with Hopi pueblos).]
Acoma tribal traditions estimate that they have lived in the village for more than two thousand years.

And that’s where I am heading today, being Monday the 17th.

Dwellings on the Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico.

Dwellings on the Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico.

_______________________________________
I’m posting this on Tuesday, September 18, 2018
This is my 161st consecutive daily posting.


Time is 3.47am and the weather in Tucumcari, New Mexico, where I’m heading after leaving Acoma Pueblo where I stayed last night is 94 and sunny.

Tucumcari is a city in and the county seat of Quay County, New Mexico, United States.
The population was 5,363 at the 2010 census.
Tucumcari was founded in 1901.





_____________________________________________
I have another gallery of Grand Canyon pix for today.

Tucumcari mountain Lots of green for such a hot part of the world.

Tucumcari mountain
Lots of green for such a hot part of the world.

Below are more pictures from the Grand Canyon.
I split them up so we may look at them without fatigue blurring our eyes.

These are pretty amazing.
So you leave your car in the lot and take a shuttle bus.
The route along the southern rim has a dozen or so stops.
One may choose none or all or any number in between.
I step off and the bus leaves.
I may wait and take the next bus [exactly 12 minutes] or walk the rim to the next stop.
I walk two stops and the steep ascents take the energy out of me.
I bus the next two stops that I choose to observe.

When I’m done I take the bus back.
Nifty.
They have it down.

_____________________________________________
Don't forget to communicate with me @
domcapossela@hotmail.com.

Marc Oliviere did:

Hey Dom,

Ever consider going into travel writing. A huge market. Lots of interest. And you’re quite good at it.

I continue to love the pictures. Wouldn’t mind seeing an image or two people along the way. Nothing like an interesting, if not unique visage of an ancient, or an innocent that could covey a story through just their look, or expression. Hey, it works for National Geographic.

And I wouldn’t mind catching one or two more of you, as well (After all, what proof do we have that you are there?––just kidding.)

Keep it up.

And Thanks,

 M.

Web Meister responds:
Thank you, Marc.

I didn’t know how to get started and I fumbled around for a few days.
But I like the rhythm that’s starting to develop.

Your idea re: people-photographs is a good one.
I will establish that as an integral part of the postings, especially being a little more at home with the camera and the technologies.

Thank you.

dom

This is where I slept last night, Monday.

This is where I slept last night, Monday.

I met some people in the afternoon whose lives revolve around their horses. They show them and perform with them. Photo inspired by Marc’s suggestion. I hope many more to come.

I met some people in the afternoon whose lives revolve around their horses.
They show them and perform with them.
Photo inspired by Marc’s suggestion.
I hope many more to come.

And so I’ll close.
Missing you all.
But the clock is ticking.
See you soon.

Dom