And then you don’t even see it anymore.

And then you don’t even see it anymore.

Over the last year I’ve noticed that my exercise routine has gotten stale.
I’ve lost the drive to challenge myself.
To finish up having improved on at least one exercise set among the 32 sets that comprise the routine.

Worse, I’ve accepted thin excuses for lightening up or skipping some exercises or even entire days.
This latter infrequent but nonetheless real.

Heading to the club, my feet have scraped their toes to slow me down.

This, coupled with a weight gain.
The two, dragging me to the top of the slippery slope of lethargy.

Stepping on the scale one not-so-fine morning sparked a determination to gird myself to care for body with more vigor than I had shown for a while.

It’s not that I equate exercising with weight loss.
I don’t: one doesn’t affect the other.
Physically.

But the two do share a common denominator: a mindset willing to make sacrifices for better health and better looks.

And that mindset set me to a sit-down with my exercise chart to revamp a rhythm that’s been very good to me for a decade.
And revamp it I did.

Successfully.
Because now my walk to the club speeded up, my frequency increased, and I gained on at least one set of exercises every time I went to the club.
And I stopped dreading stepping on the scale.

I’ve noticed that the changes I made to my exercise routine have been successful.

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Tagging Today
Friday, November 9, 2018
My 213th consecutive posting.
Time is 12.01am.
Boston’s temperature will reach a high of 51* and will see occasional rain in the pm.

Dinner is Hot Pot. This variation described later in this post.

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Quiz Question of the Day:
What is sunrise?

Hint: City Life:
Living high up in an apartment complex has a lot of good points.
One of them is astronomical. Here, a sunrise from our window.
Except the bottom right is from the Mojave Desert. Needed one more for symmetry, you know.

So many variations possible.

So many variations possible.

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Short Takes
So often we convert the last of the roast turkey into a soup. Of course.
A large stock pot, a 4-cup container of our ‘always on hand’ chicken stock, the turkey carcass and meats, onion, celery, carrot, all into pot and added water to cover.
Simmer for a couple of hours, strain, and throw out all solids.
We’ll save some of the soup broth to reduce and add to the turkey gravy tub that we always keep on hand for our next turkey.
The remainder of the broth we’ll use for a hot pot.
Tonight I want a very simple Hot Pot: leeks, bok choy, watercress or other green leaf, mushrooms, Chinese dumplings, and shrimp, scallops, little neck clams, and fresh Salmon.
Quantities will depend on how much broth we have.
We can use the recipe for Hot Pot in our Recipe section as a guideline.
But this will be a greatly simplified version of the recipe.

This is a False Sunrise, a very particular kind of Parhelion Florenus - Own work   A sun dog (or sundog) or mock sun, formally called a parhelion is an atmospheric optical phenomenon that consists of a bright spot to one or both sides of the Sun. Two sun dogs often flank the Sun within a 22° halo.  The sun dog is a member of the family of halos, caused by the refraction of sunlight by ice crystals in the atmosphere.  Sun dogs typically appear as a pair of subtly colored patches of light, around 22° to the left and right of the Sun, and at the same altitude above the horizon as the Sun.  They can be seen anywhere in the world during any season, but are not always obvious or bright.  Sun dogs are best seen and most conspicuous when the Sun is near the horizon.

This is a False Sunrise, a very particular kind of Parhelion
Florenus - Own work

A sun dog (or sundog) or mock sun, formally called a parhelion is an atmospheric optical phenomenon that consists of a bright spot to one or both sides of the Sun. Two sun dogs often flank the Sun within a 22° halo.

The sun dog is a member of the family of halos, caused by the refraction of sunlight by ice crystals in the atmosphere.
Sun dogs typically appear as a pair of subtly colored patches of light, around 22° to the left and right of the Sun, and at the same altitude above the horizon as the Sun.
They can be seen anywhere in the world during any season, but are not always obvious or bright.
Sun dogs are best seen and most conspicuous when the Sun is near the horizon.

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Answer to Question:
Sunrise or sun up is the moment when the upper limb of the Sun appears on the horizon in the morning.
The term can also refer to the entire process of the solar disk crossing the horizon and its accompanying atmospheric effects.

Although the Sun appears to "rise" from the horizon, it is actually the Earth's motion that causes the Sun to appear.
The illusion of a moving Sun results from Earth observers being in a rotating reference frame; this apparent motion is so convincing that most cultures had mythologies and religions built around the geocentric model, which prevailed until astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus first formulated the heliocentric model in the 16th century.

TIME
Astronomically, sunrise occurs for only an instant: the moment at which the upper limb of the Sun appears tangent to the horizon.
However, the term sunrise commonly refers to periods of time both before and after this point.

Before the sun rises is Twilight, the period in the morning during which the sky is brightening, but the Sun is not yet visible. The beginning of morning twilight is called astronomical dawn.

The period after the Sun rises but during which striking colors and atmospheric effects are still seen.

Sunrise actually occurs before the Sun truly reaches the horizon because Earth's atmosphere refracts the Sun's image.

The timing of sunrise varies throughout the year and is also affected by the viewer's longitude and latitude, altitude, and time zone.
These changes are driven by the axial tilt of Earth, daily rotation of the Earth, the planet's movement in its annual elliptical orbit around the Sun, and the Earth and Moon's paired revolutions around each other.

In late winter and spring, sunrise as seen from temperate latitudes occurs earlier each day, reaching its earliest time near the summer solstice; although the exact date varies by latitude.
After this point, the time of sunrise gets later each day, reaching its latest sometime around the winter solstice.
The offset between the dates of the solstice and the earliest or latest sunrise time is caused by the eccentricity of Earth's orbit and the tilt of its axis.

Variations in atmospheric refraction can alter the time of sunrise by changing its apparent position.
Near the poles, the time-of-day variation is exaggerated, since the Sun crosses the horizon at a very shallow angle and thus rises more slowly.

Sunrises occur approximately due east on the March and September equinoxes for all viewers on Earth.

Peach sunrise over the sea, Sydney, Australia Anton Gorlin - Beautiful Pictures  Ash from volcanic eruptions, trapped within the troposphere, tends to mute sunset and sunrise colors, while volcanic ejecta that is instead lofted into the stratosphere (as thin clouds of tiny sulfuric acid droplets), can yield beautiful post-sunset colors called afterglows and pre-sunrise glows.  A number of eruptions, including those of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 and Krakatoa in 1883, have produced sufficiently high stratospheric sulfuric acid clouds to yield remarkable sunset afterglows (and pre-sunrise glows) around the world.  The high altitude clouds serve to reflect strongly reddened sunlight still striking the stratosphere after sunset, down to the surface.

Peach sunrise over the sea, Sydney, Australia
Anton Gorlin - Beautiful Pictures

Ash from volcanic eruptions, trapped within the troposphere, tends to mute sunset and sunrise colors, while volcanic ejecta that is instead lofted into the stratosphere (as thin clouds of tiny sulfuric acid droplets), can yield beautiful post-sunset colors called afterglows and pre-sunrise glows.
A number of eruptions, including those of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 and Krakatoa in 1883, have produced sufficiently high stratospheric sulfuric acid clouds to yield remarkable sunset afterglows (and pre-sunrise glows) around the world.
The high altitude clouds serve to reflect strongly reddened sunlight still striking the stratosphere after sunset, down to the surface.

COLOR:
Air molecules and airborne particles scatter white sunlight as it passes through the Earth's atmosphere. As a ray of white sunlight travels through the atmosphere to an observer, some of the colors are scattered out of the beam by air molecules and airborne particles, changing the final color of the beam the viewer sees.
Because the shorter wavelength components, such as blue and green, scatter more strongly, these colors are preferentially removed from the beam.

At sunrise and sunset, when the path through the atmosphere is longer, the blue and green components are removed almost completely leaving the longer wavelength orange and red hues seen at those times. The remaining reddened sunlight can then be scattered by cloud droplets and other relatively large particles to light up the horizon red and orange.

Sunset colors are typically more brilliant than sunrise colors, because the evening air contains more particles than morning air.

 

What’s in that bag?

What’s in that bag?

A November 9, Friday, Good Morning.
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We’ve talked about breaking up or at least recharging a routine, sunrises, and hot pot simplified.
And we’ve looked at some images.

Che vuoi? Le pocketbook? (new photo installed)

Have a good day, my friends.
See you soon.

Love

Dom