Planning.
Sometimes the best part of traveling.
Like when you have to cancel your plans.
But you’ve been planning for weeks, spending part of every day adding to your store of knowledge about the place including its art, people, climate, important sites.
You can’t cancel that.
No one can take those long hours of creativity as you gather information and piece the trip together.

Some people don’t like to plan. Go there and decide what to do. I did that on my 24-day trip to Jackson Hole: the distances between points of interest were great. Had to see where I’d be when I chose to stop driving. My trip to Tuscany will be well planned out: art and food and walking and soaking in the culture. Unhurried, flexible, but with a checklist.

Some people don’t like to plan.
Go there and decide what to do.
I did that on my 24-day trip to Jackson Hole: the distances between points of interest were great.
Had to see where I’d be when I chose to stop driving.
My trip to Tuscany will be well planned out: art and food and walking and soaking in the culture. Unhurried, flexible, but with a checklist.

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Thursday’s posting.
October 4, 2018
My 177th consecutive daily posting.
Time is 3.44am.
Boston’s temperature will get to 77 under sunny skies.

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Question of the day:
Who was Cimabue?
With Tuscany in the planning stages, that’s got to be a clue.

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Love your notes.
Contact me @ domcapossela@hotmail.com
This sent Wednesday, 10/3, by Tommie Toner, a South Carolinian:

I think "America" has lost her identity as far as the open road goes. She is too caught up in money, money, money and convenience, convenience, convenience rather quality, quality, quality. Makes me sad. I have hope that our grandchildren will reverse or change our mediocre ways to a richer (not necessarily "wealthier"), more mindful way of life. I also think we live such "fast" lives - not taking the time to drive the back roads, to be thoughtful, to enjoy little pieces of beauty that bring great peace and joy. I am guilty - as I drive to Beaufort so often, I take the fast track - stopping at McDonald's - rather than driving the back roads and enjoying the landscape and small towns - which for the most part are dead, but there a few with good little pie shops and southern cooking. Please note: these are my narrow thoughts based on limited observations.

It also makes me sad to go to Paris and see a damn McDonald's - I don't give a rat's ass if wine is served - it is just abhorrent to see yellow arches in that beautiful place.

Web Meister Responds: D’Accord! I love watching Tommie wind up and then follow through where her thoughts take her. Always interesting places.
I thought I’d illustrate her displeasure.

Haute cuisine? No! But I’d definitely take a bite.

Haute cuisine? No!
But I’d definitely take a bite.

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So yesterday I mentioned that I had read “Big Stone Gap,” by Ariana Trigiano.
Last night, Tuesday, I saw the movie with Ashely Judd et al.
Cost me $3.99 as a rental.
I’m glad I saw what they did with the movie.
Simplify to the loss of pathos or joy.
I enjoyed the movie but would not recommend it.
It ain’t that pretty at all.

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So yesterday I mentioned that I had read “Big Stone Gap,” by Ariana Trigiano. Last night, Tuesday, I saw the movie with Ashely Judd et al. Cost me $3.99 as a rental. I’m glad I saw what they did with the movie.  Simplify to the loss of pathos or joy. I enjoyed the movie but would not recommend it. It ain’t that pretty at all.

So yesterday I mentioned that I had read “Big Stone Gap,” by Ariana Trigiano.
Last night, Tuesday, I saw the movie with Ashely Judd et al.
Cost me $3.99 as a rental.
I’m glad I saw what they did with the movie.
Simplify to the loss of pathos or joy.
I enjoyed the movie but would not recommend it.
It ain’t that pretty at all.

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Answer:
Cimabue was an Italian painter and designer of mosaics from Florence.

Although heavily influenced by Byzantine models, Cimabue is generally regarded as one of the first great Italian painters to break from the Italo-Byzantine style.

While medieval art then was scenes and forms that appeared relatively flat and highly stylized, Cimabue's figures were depicted with more-advanced lifelike proportions and shading than other artists of his time.

Here is an example of his work.

Cimabue's Arezzo crucifix, c. 1268–1271, above, hangs in The Basilica of San Domenico, a medieval church in Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy, dedicated to St Domenic. This is the earlier of the two extant crucifixes attributed to him. In fact, t’s probably his earliest extant work. The later one, in much poorer condition, hangs in the Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence. Cimabue breathes new emotive content into the abstract or stylized forms of the Byzantine Art that dominated Europe at this time. Along with the traditional stylization of the human form, Cimabue seems to have been among the first to return to a close observation of nature. The Crucifixion is sculpturally conceived and its solidity and bulk lend a heightened sense of drama. Many consider him the first Florentine painter and the first painter of the “modern” times that Duccio and Giotto and Florence will bring into flower: Renaissance Art.

Cimabue's Arezzo crucifix, c. 1268–1271, above, hangs in The Basilica of San Domenico, a medieval church in Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy, dedicated to St Domenic.
This is the earlier of the two extant crucifixes attributed to him.
In fact, t’s probably his earliest extant work.
The later one, in much poorer condition, hangs in the Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence.
Cimabue breathes new emotive content into the abstract or stylized forms of the Byzantine Art that dominated Europe at this time.
Along with the traditional stylization of the human form, Cimabue seems to have been among the first to return to a close observation of nature.
The Crucifixion is sculpturally conceived and its solidity and bulk lend a heightened sense of drama.
Many consider him the first Florentine painter and the first painter of the “modern” times that Duccio and Giotto and Florence will bring into flower: Renaissance Art.

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So ciao, my friends.
A good day to all.

Love you,

Dom

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