You can help.

You can help.

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Friday, April 12, 2019

God asks us not to ask Him why we are in the middle of so much misery.
God asks us to, instead, help someone near us.
God asks us to reach out our arms and touch someone.
Give them a shoulder.
A hand.
Your arms.
A shirt.

God asks us not to ask Him why we are in the middle of so much misery.
When the answer is locked within ourselves. 

While rain is still predicted for the Boston Marathon, the projected temperature has ticked up to 55.  Remember that it’s springtime according to our own calendar. Starting April 7, extending to June 15.  Tick Tock. In clock language:   Enjoy today. Enjoy the week.

While rain is still predicted for the Boston Marathon, the projected temperature has ticked up to 55.

Remember that it’s springtime according to our own calendar. Starting April 7, extending to June 15.

Tick Tock.
In clock language:

Enjoy today.
Enjoy the week.

 

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Postings Count, Weather Brief, and Dinner

Friday, April 12, 2019

My 371st consecutive posting, committed to 5,000.
After 371 posts we’re at the 7.42% mark of my commitment, the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.

Time is 12.01am.

On Friday, Boston’s temperature will reach a high of 55* with a feels-like temperature of 54* under a mix of skies.

Dinner in Philadelphia @ Talulah’s Garden. Been there. Excellent.

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Question of the Day:
Who was Charles Lindbergh?

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Friday, April 12, 2019
Love your notes.
Contact me at domcapossela@hotmail.com

From Sally C., re: Colleen’s Poem Read at the blog’s celebration dinner:

Touche!  To both you and Colleen! 

Sally

Web Meister Responds: Thank you, my dear. And thank you for all of your supportive and useful comments on my manuscript.

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And from Kay Kane:

Dom,

You have mastered the art of the dinner party and Dave & I feel so lucky to have been included! Only you could pull together such a fabulous group of people and have them laughing and sharing all night. I am so sorry we couldn’t stay but appreciate the opportunity you gave us to salut the blog :)

Love you (and the Kilzers) dearly!

Web Meister Responds: Kay donated a magnum bottle of Aubry Champagne and then shepherded through the group for signatures. Innovative and thoughtful, and full of fun, inside and out.
It sits in a place of honor waiting for the next celebration.
Thank you, Kay.

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Chuckle of the Day
:
Lawyers use Viagra to get taller.

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Answer to the Question of the Day:
Who was Charles Lindbergh?

Charles Lindbergh Harris & Ewing - This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division

Charles Lindbergh
Harris & Ewing - This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division

Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) was an American aviator, military officer, author, inventor, explorer, and environmental activist.
At age 25 in 1927, he went from obscurity as a U.S. Air Mail pilot to instantaneous world fame by winning the Orteig Prize: making a nonstop flight from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, to Paris, France.

Lindbergh covered the 331⁄2-hour, 3,600-statute-mile (5,800 km) flight alone in a single-engine purpose-built Ryan monoplane, the Spirit of St. Louis.

Lindbergh's flight was not the first transatlantic flight; the Curtiss NC-4 achieved the goal of the first successful transatlantic flight by flying from Rockaway, New York to Lisbon, Portugal on May 27, 1919.
Lindbergh's flight was, however, the first solo, non-stop transatlantic flight, and one made between two major cities, and by a man barely 25 years of age.

Lindbergh was an officer in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve, and he received the United States' highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for the feat, and many other awards and other forms of recognition from many countries.
Lindbergh's achievement spurred interest in both commercial aviation and air mail, and he devoted much time and effort to promoting such activity.

Lindbergh’s historic flight and extraordinary celebrity status also led to tragedy.
In March 1932, his infant son, Charles Jr., was kidnapped and murdered in what American media called the "Crime of the Century" and was described by H. L. Mencken as "the biggest story since the Resurrection".

The crime of the century. The biggest story since the resurrection.

The crime of the century.
The biggest story since the resurrection.

The case prompted the United States Congress to establish kidnapping as a federal crime once the kidnapper had crossed state lines with their victim.
By late 1935, the hysteria surrounding the case had driven the Lindbergh family into voluntary exile in Europe, from which they returned in 1939.

Before the United States formally entered World War II, Lindbergh was an advocate of non-interventionism.
He supported the antiwar America First Committee, which opposed American aid to Britain in its war against Germany, and resigned his commission in the United States Army Air Forces in 1941 after President Franklin Roosevelt publicly rebuked him for his views.

Nevertheless, he publicly supported the U.S. war effort after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and flew fifty combat missions in the Pacific Theater of World War II as a civilian consultant, though Roosevelt refused to reinstate his Air Corps colonel's commission.
In his later years, Lindbergh became a prolific prize-winning author, international explorer, inventor, and environmentalist.

I have three friends in one form of distress or another. I wrote their names down and an idea of how I may help a bit.

I have three friends in one form of distress or another.
I wrote their names down and an idea of how I may help a bit.

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Good Morning on this Friday, the Twelfth Day of April.

Today we talked about what God asks of us; and of the weather, the calendar, and dinner.
We posted a new chuckle, letters from Sally C and Kay K, and a brief bio on Charles Lindbergh.
 
And now? Gotta go.

Che vuoi? Le pocketbook?

See you soon.

Your Love