Connectivity: Basic

Connectivity: Basic

Loss of connectivity never meant more to the human race.
How many John the Baptists were there?
A notable few.

Today, we all stand threatened with disconnection.
This week, this blog’s host, Squarespace, loss connectivity resulting in the isolation of all of its members; the separation of the bloggers from their blogs.
Our own bloggers logged on only to find notices of disconnection, leaving them wondering if it was on me or some far higher power.

This morning, I lost my connection to cablevision, and both today and tomorrow having TV guests, one for episodes and tomorrow’s for the football playoffs.
Comcast could not get me up electronically and is sending a technician Sunday, between 12 and 2pm.

I’ve notified my guests.
Saturday’s will come despite the lack of screen.
Sunday’s have invited me to their house.
I declined.
Technician due between 12 and 2pm.
Game time.
And the new season of Victoria starts Sunday night.

Connectivity.
Hardly happiness.
And yet important.

How good a thing?

277 posts to date. Today we’re at the 5.54% mark of my commitment, the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.  5,000 posts will take 13.69 years, taking me to a new phase of my life. That phase too distant from today with too many variables to make planning for it feasible.  13.69 years, a big chunk, too big, really, to be much affected by a single day.  So we’ll be marking this phase not by single days but by segments of the year. We are in our winter-calendar segment, defined as starting Jan 2 and ending Feb 13. Forty-three days, this piece. One of only approximately 116 similar segments.  116. Not nearly as daunting as 5,000. 116. Not so far away.  Tick Tock. In clock language: Enjoy today.

277 posts to date.
Today we’re at the 5.54% mark of my commitment,
the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.

5,000 posts will take 13.69 years, taking me to a new phase of my life.
That phase too distant from today with too many variables to make planning for it feasible.

13.69 years, a big chunk, too big, really, to be much affected by a single day.

So we’ll be marking this phase not by single days but by segments of the year.
We are in our winter-calendar segment, defined as starting Jan 2 and ending Feb 13.
Forty-three days, this piece.
One of only approximately 116 similar segments.

116. Not nearly as daunting as 5,000.
116.
Not so far away.

Tick Tock.
In clock language: Enjoy today.

__________________________
Tagging Today

Monday, January 14, 2019
My 277th consecutive posting, committed to 5,000.
Time is 12.01am.
On Monday, Boston’s temperature will reach a high of 33* with a feels-like temperature of 27*, in both instances noticeably [5 degrees] warmer than Sunday.

Dinner Sunday is Slow-Roasted Turkey dinner with Stuffing.



 

 

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Question of the day:
What is the Bohemian Rhapsody?

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Short Takes: City Life
I see this sunrise daily but it never ceases to enthrall me.
And spreading some of the joy of winter on the Boston Common.

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Answer to Question of the day:
What is the Bohemian Rhapsody?  

Queen — Freddie Mercury at Live Aids.

Queen — Freddie Mercury at Live Aids.

"Bohemian Rhapsody" is a song by the British rock band Queen.
It was written by Freddie Mercury for the band's 1975 album A Night at the Opera.
It is a six-minute suite, consisting of several sections without a chorus: an intro, a ballad segment, an operatic passage, a hard rock part and a reflective coda.
The song is a more accessible take on the 1970s progressive rock genre.

The four members of the band sit together in front of a sandy-coloured background wearing predominantly black clothing.  Mercury appears to be the dominant figure, sat in front of the other three members.  From left to right, John Deacon, Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor.  All four individuals are looking directly at the camera with a neutral expression on their face.  Above the band is some black text, printed in an elegant, italic font face.  The word "Queen" followed by "Bohemian Rhapsody", the latter of which is positioned under the band name in the same format yet smaller font.

The four members of the band sit together in front of a sandy-coloured background wearing predominantly black clothing.
Mercury appears to be the dominant figure, sat in front of the other three members.
From left to right, John Deacon, Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor.
All four individuals are looking directly at the camera with a neutral expression on their face.
Above the band is some black text, printed in an elegant, italic font face.
The word "Queen" followed by "Bohemian Rhapsody", the latter of which is positioned under the band name in the same format yet smaller font.

When it was released as a single, "Bohemian Rhapsody" became a commercial success, staying at the top of the UK Singles Chart for nine weeks and selling more than a million copies by the end of January 1976.
It reached number one again in 1991 for another five weeks when the same version was re-released following Mercury's death, eventually becoming the UK's third-best-selling single of all time.
It is also the only song to be the UK Christmas number one twice by the same artist.
It topped the charts in several other markets as well, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, and The Netherlands, later becoming one of the best-selling singles of all time selling over six million copies worldwide.
In the United States, the song originally peaked at number nine in 1976.
It returned to the chart at number two in 1992 after being used in the film Wayne's World, which contributed to the revival of its American popularity.

Live Aids with Queen, Freddie Mercury singing at piano

Live Aids with Queen, Freddie Mercury singing at piano

Although critical reaction was initially mixed, "Bohemian Rhapsody" remains one of Queen's most popular songs and is frequently considered one of the greatest rock songs of all time.
The single was accompanied by a promotional video, which many scholars consider ground-breaking. Rolling Stone stated that its influence "cannot be overstated, practically inventing the music video seven years before MTV went on the air."
The Guardian ranked the music video for "Bohemian Rhapsody" number 31 on their list of the 50 key events in rock music history, adding it ensured "videos would henceforth be a mandatory tool in the marketing of music".

In 2004, "Bohemian Rhapsody" was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.
In 2012, the song topped the list on an ITV nationwide poll in the UK to find "The Nation's Favorite Number One" over 60 years of music, while Mercury's vocal performance was chosen as the greatest in rock history by readers of Rolling Stone.
In December 2018, "Bohemian Rhapsody" officially became the most-streamed song from the 20th century, and the most-streamed classic rock song of all time.
The number of downloads of the song and original video exceeded 1.6 billion downloads across global on-demand streaming services.

"Bohemian Rhapsody" 

J. S. Grimaldi as Scaramouche, c. 1815  Charles Chabot (1790-1866) - https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O184965/h-beard-print-collection-print-chabot-c/

J. S. Grimaldi as Scaramouche, c. 1815

Charles Chabot (1790-1866) - https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O184965/h-beard-print-collection-print-chabot-c/

Is this the real life?
Is this just fantasy?
Caught in a landslide,
No escape from reality. 

Open your eyes,
Look up to the skies and see,
I'm just a poor boy, I need no sympathy,
Because I'm easy come, easy go,
Little high, little low,
Any way the wind blows doesn't really matter to me, to me. 

Mama, just killed a man,
Put a gun against his head,
Pulled my trigger, now he's dead.
Mama, life had just begun,
But now I've gone and thrown it all away. 

Mama, ooh,
Didn't mean to make you cry,
If I'm not back again this time tomorrow,
Carry on, carry on as if nothing really matters. 

Too late, my time has come,
Sends shivers down my spine,
Body's aching all the time.
Goodbye, everybody, I've got to go,
Gotta leave you all behind and face the truth. 

Mama, ooh (any way the wind blows),
I don't wanna die,
I sometimes wish I'd never been born at all. 

Portrait of Galileo Galilei (1636), by Justus Sustermans

Portrait of Galileo Galilei (1636), by Justus Sustermans

I see a little silhouetto of a man,
Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the Fandango?
Thunderbolt and lightning,
Very, very frightening me.
(Galileo) Galileo.
(Galileo) Galileo,
Galileo Figaro
Magnifico-o-o-o-o. 

I'm just a poor boy, nobody loves me.
He's just a poor boy from a poor family,
Spare him his life from this monstrosity.

Easy come, easy go, will you let me go?
Bismillah! No, we will not let you go. (Let him go!)
Bismillah! We will not let you go. (Let him go!)
Bismillah! We will not let you go. (Let me go!)
Will not let you go. (Let me go!)
Never let you go (Never, never, never, never let me go)
Oh oh oh oh
No, no, no, no, no, no, no

Oh, mama mia, mama mia (Mama mia, let me go.)
Beelzebub has a devil put aside for me, for me, for me. 

So you think you can stone me and spit in my eye?
So you think you can love me and leave me to die?
Oh, baby, can't do this to me, baby,
Just gotta get out, just gotta get right outta here. 

(Ooooh, ooh yeah, ooh yeah) 
Nothing really matters,
Anyone can see,
Nothing really matters,
Nothing really matters to me. 

Any way the wind blows.



I have some original scribblings of the lyrics.

I have some original scribblings of the lyrics.

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Good morning on this Monday, the 14th day of January.
We talked about connectivity.
The time and weather.
We looked at some pix of city life and we discussed Bohemian Rhapsody, the song.

Che vuoi? Le pocketbook?

See you soon.

Love

Dom