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Friday, March 8, 2019

One swallow does not a summer make.
Two?

I’ve written a couple of times that the Boston Celtics are going no place interesting until All-Star Gordon Hayward is recovered from his horrendous injury sustained a year ago.
This is from yesterday’s Boston Gobe:

By Gary Washburn/Globe Staff
March 7, 2019

SACRAMENTO — On this occasion, Gordon Hayward had no time to think.
The Celtics were out of timeouts and the Kings had just tied the score with 7.5 seconds left on three free throws by Buddy Hield.

When he doesn’t have time to think is when Hayward is at his best, and he charged the ball up the floor at Golden 1 Center.
He drove past a backpedaling Hield and lofted an 8-foot floater that swished with 2 seconds left.

Gordon Hayward (right) celebrated after he scored the game winning shot, beating the Sacramento Kings 111-109 Wednesday, March 6 in Sacramento, Calif.   Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

Gordon Hayward (right) celebrated after he scored the game winning shot, beating the Sacramento Kings 111-109 Wednesday, March 6 in Sacramento, Calif.

Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

The Celtics forced a Harrison Barnes 3-point miss at the buzzer and held on for a 111-109 win, with Hayward notching his first game-winner as a Celtic and capping a two-day stretch where he was integral to two critical wins.

On Tuesday against Golden State, Hayward scored 30 points in a blowout and few of his points were pressure-packed.
His 12 points in 29 minutes were more impactful Wednesday.
The Celtics needed every one to stave off a game Kings team that is chasing the final Western Conference playoff spot.

So wrote Washburn.

One swallow does not a summer make.
Two swallows?

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Postings Count, Weather Brief, and Dinner
Friday, March 8, 2019

Beef tenderloin roast whole.png

My 330th consecutive posting, committed to 5,000.

Time is 12.01am.
On Friday Boston’s temperature will reach a high of 36* with a feels-like temperature of 27*, with sunny skies.

Dinner, at a dinner party of sixteen, hosted by dear friends in honor of a birthday, includes Pasta Pesto, Tenderloin, slow-roasted with beef gravy enhanced with mushrooms, garlic and basil. Dessert, a chocolatey ‘Harvard Square’ brownie from the King of Boston Chocolate, Burdick’s.




A significant improvement. And it’s March and we may justly anticipate the absence of freezing weather after that.    Tick Tock. In clock language: Enjoy today.

A significant improvement.
And it’s March and we may justly anticipate the absence of freezing weather after that.

Tick Tock.
In clock language: Enjoy today.

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Tick Tock
: Marking Calendars and Deep Weather

After 330 posts we’re at the 6.60% mark of my commitment,
the commitment a different way of marking the passage of time.

Today our winter-spring shoulder calendar proves its worth.
True, another really cold day.
But the last of this sequence, and none of the next five days below the high thirties.

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Question of the Day
Who is Alfred Stieglitz?

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Love your notes.
Contact me at existentialautotrip@hotmail.com

This from Howard, our dear friend and source of much content. Re: The Penny Marshall Post:

Grand Concourse, Bronx

Grand Concourse, Bronx

According to the biography of Penny Marshall, which you quoted, she grew up at 3235 Grand Concourse in the Bronx. 

You may recall I grew up in the Bronx. 

I never knew her address (no reason I would have). 

However, there is the coincidence that throughout my childhood, I regularly visited the apartment my uncle lived in. I don’t recall the days when he lived there with my grandparents and my great uncle—he also had a dental office in the same suite—as they were all gone by the time I can remember anything. But I remember the building quite clearly. Further, some time later, probably in the very late 50s or early 60s, he moved to a much smaller apartment in a brand new building that was almost precisely across the street. 

The street was the Grand Concourse, the same street Penny lived on. My uncle’s address was 3065 (and later, it was 3130) barely three blocks away from the Marshalls. 

I certainly always felt a kinship just hearing what she did to the English language with her Bronx accent (exaggerated significantly for her role in Shirley and Laverne), the same accent I grew up adopting, not that I had a choice I guess. I also taught myself to get rid of it, after we moved to Providence RI, when I was ten. I was ridiculed for the way I spoke, so I decided not to give my new friends the satisfaction, and I also gave myself the satisfaction of learning to speak English with a more neutral accent, as I had no desire to sound like I came from Providence, which had as characteristic (and to my ears as heinous) an accent as one from New Yawk… 

Thought you’d be interested. 

xoxo 

hhd

Web Meister Responds: Lovely memories. Thanks for sharing.

Because their tennis shoes are too tight.

Because their tennis shoes are too tight.

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Elephant jokes to tell at a bar:
Why do elephants have wrinkled ankles?            




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Answer to the Question of the Day
Who is Alfred Stieglitz?

Stieglitz was married to painter Georgia O'Keeffe.

Stieglitz was married to painter Georgia O'Keeffe.

Alfred Stieglitz (January 1, 1864 – July 13, 1946) was an American photographer and modern art promoter who was instrumental over his fifty-year career in making photography an accepted art form.

In addition to his photography, Stieglitz was known for the New York art galleries that he ran in the early part of the 20th century, where he introduced many avant-garde European artists to the U.S.




In 1884, his parents returned to America, but 20-year-old Stieglitz remained in Germany and collected books on photography and photographers in Europe and the U.S.
Through his self-study, he saw photography as an art form.
In 1887, he wrote his very first article, "A Word or Two about Amateur Photography in Germany", for the new magazine The Amateur Photographer.
He then wrote articles on the technical and aesthetic aspects of photography for magazines in England and Germany.

Alfred Stieglitz, The Last Joke, Bellagio, 1887

Alfred Stieglitz, The Last Joke, Bellagio, 1887

He won first place for his photography, The Last Joke, Bellagio, in 1887 from Amateur Photographer. The next year he won both first and second prizes in the same competition, and his reputation began to spread as several German and British photographic magazines published his work.

In December 1901, he was invited by Charles DeKay of the National Arts Club to put together an exhibition in which Stieglitz would have "full power to follow his own inclinations."
Within two months Stieglitz had assembled a collection of prints from a close circle of his friends, which, in homage to the Munich photographers, he called the Photo-Secession.

Spring Showers, The Coach  (1902) by Stieglitz  - Camera Notes, Vol 5 No 3 1902

Spring Showers, The Coach (1902) by Stieglitz
- Camera Notes, Vol 5 No 3 1902

We are searching for the ultimate truth... We believe that if only people are taught to appreciate the beautiful side of their daily existence, to be aware of all the beauty which constantly surrounds them, they must gradually approach this ideal. For beauty is the ultimate truth, and truth means freedom."

Stieglitz was not only declaring a secession from the general artistic restrictions of the era, but specifically from the official oversight of the Camera Club.
The show opened at the Arts Club in early March 1902, and it was an immediate success.













Part Two: Will be presented in another posting.

But here is a summary of Stieglitz’s life:

Stieglitz produced more than 2,500 mounted photographs over his career.
After his death, Georgia O'Keeffe, his wife, assembled a set of what she considered the best of his photographs that he had personally mounted.

In some cases she included slightly different versions of the same image, and these series are invaluable for their insights about Stieglitz's aesthetic composition.
In 1949, she donated the first part of what she called the "key set" of 1,317 Stieglitz photographs to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.
In 1980, she added to the set another 325 photographs taken by Stieglitz of her, including many nudes. Now numbering 1,642 photographs, it is the largest, most complete collection of Stieglitz's work anywhere in the world.
In 2002 the National Gallery published a two-volume, 1,012-page catalog that reproduced the complete key set along with detailed annotations about each photograph.

Legacy

"Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946) is perhaps the most important figure in the history of visual arts in America.
That is certainly not to say that he was the greatest artist America has ever produced.
Rather, through his many roles – as a photographer, as a discoverer and promoter of photographers and of artists in other media, and as a publisher, patron, and collector – he had a greater impact on American art than any other person has had.

"Alfred Stieglitz had the multifold abilities of a Renaissance man.
A visionary of enormously wide perspective, his accomplishments were remarkable, his dedication awe-inspiring.
A photographer of genius, a publisher of inspiration, a writer of great ability, a gallery owner and exhibition organizer of both photographic and modern art exhibitions, a catalyst and a charismatic leader in the photographic and art worlds for over thirty years, he was, necessarily, a passionate, complex, driven and highly contradictory character, both prophet and martyr.
The ultimate maverick, he inspired great love and great hatred in equal measure."

Eight of the nine highest prices ever paid at auction for Stieglitz photographs (as of 2008) are images of Georgia O'Keeffe.   Stieglitz: Georgia O’Keefe

Eight of the nine highest prices ever paid at auction for Stieglitz photographs (as of 2008) are images of Georgia O'Keeffe.

Stieglitz: Georgia O’Keefe

The highest-priced photograph, a 1919 palladium print of Georgia O'Keeffe (Hands), realized US$1.47 million at auction in February 2006.
At the same sale, Georgia O'Keeffe Nude, another 1919 print by Stieglitz, sold for $1.36 million.

A large number of his works are held at the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

I have a basketball in here signed by Gordon Hayward. I had to soften the ball a la Tom Brady to make it fit. That’s okay.

I have a basketball in here signed by Gordon Hayward.
I had to soften the ball a la Tom Brady to make it fit.
That’s okay.

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Good Morning on this Friday, the Eighth of March.
Today we talked about whether two swallows make a summer.
We talked about the changing weather pattern and dinner at a birthday party.
We took a measurement of time by calendar segments and predicted the weather several days out.
And looked at the amazing work of Alfred Stieglitz.

And now? Gotta go.

Che vuoi? Le pocketbook?

See you soon.

Your Love