When not eating dinner at the Publican, (I'll report on this tomorrow,) I spent my time at the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Today is Sunday, September 9, 2018
This is my 152nd consecutive daily posting.
Time is 4.56 and the weather in Omaha, NE apears to be a perfectly lovely 75* and sunny. I'll be there in the afternoon.

Today’s dinner is…is at an Omaha Steakhouse called Brother Sebastian's.
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Bathers by a River is considered by Henri Matisse to be one of the five most "pivotal" works of his career, and with good reason: it facilitated the evolution of the artist's style over the course of nearly a decade. The angle of the photograph adding vibrancy to the work is the by-product of the Web Meister's artistic genius. Or unsteady camera.  The 8-foot by 12-foot work combines an extreme of abstraction with readable figurative images. Over a period of years, Matisse changed it from a gentle pastel-colored beach scene to an exotic Eden. Four female demigoddesses are outlined against a row of broad flat vertical panels, with a white snake rearing up its head from the bottom of the canvas. Matisse doesn't explain the iconography.  The history of the changes Matisse made to this work illustrates a period of staggering artistic ferment propelling Matisse's search for direction.  

Bathers by a River is considered by Henri Matisse to be one of the five most "pivotal" works of his career, and with good reason: it facilitated the evolution of the artist's style over the course of nearly a decade.
The angle of the photograph adding vibrancy to the work is the by-product of the Web Meister's artistic genius.
Or unsteady camera.

The 8-foot by 12-foot work combines an extreme of abstraction with readable figurative images.
Over a period of years, Matisse changed it from a gentle pastel-colored beach scene to an exotic Eden.
Four female demigoddesses are outlined against a row of broad flat vertical panels, with a white snake rearing up its head from the bottom of the canvas.
Matisse doesn't explain the iconography.

The history of the changes Matisse made to this work illustrates a period of staggering artistic ferment propelling Matisse's search for direction.
 

What follows are some works by Picasso and a single from Dali.
I took more but they didn’t come out well enough to post.
I’ll get better.

Mother and Child

Mother and Child

picasso text mother and child.png
The Red Arm Chair

The Red Arm Chair

picasso text the red armchair.png
Nude under a pine tree

Nude under a pine tree

picasso text nude under a pine tree.png
Invention of the Monsters

Invention of the Monsters

dali text monsters.png


I intended to stay longer this morning at the Chicago hotel but the union went on strike yesterday, leaving today’s staff non-existent.
This is a big hotel.
At 5.30 this morning I was at the desk when the management was girding to make up for the lack of workers.
Hundreds of workers.
Tens of unskilled managers.
I left my room early and, after some negotiations of my own, found a clear path out, with the help of one of the beset managers.

Now I’m in the car passing through Illinois and into Iowa.
“You really otta give Iowa a try.  Provided you’re contrary.” The Music Man.

Iowa.
Never thought I’d be in Iowa but here I am.
I got 110 miles to go on route 80 W.
Iowa.
“Where the corn is as high as an ele…” Oops. That Oklahoma.
I took a shot of an Iowa field with the browns and yellows of late summer.

Traveling at two to three miles below the limit is truly recreational.
Traveling so many miles you’d think I’d be hurrying.
The reverse.
I am wallowing in the lack of tension that driving in front of traffic brings onto yourself.

Frankly, however, the fly in the ointment here is that we have two posted speed limits, 70 for autos, 60 for trucks.
Intending to go two miles under the limit, I’m going 8 miles over the truck limit.
I don’t get the peace I’m entitled to.

Sometimes I have to pass, and to do it in an authoritative way that blocks any attempt for the passed vehicle to challenge.
For I pass at 85 and as I pass the vehicle I maintain 85 for 5 seconds before pulling over into the right lane and permitting the car to return to its speed, 2 miles under the limit for cars.

Also, I continue with my frequent stops for relief, for a nap, and for gas
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Don't forget to communicate with me @
domcapossela@hotmail.com.

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So I’m passing the baton to Howard, my friends.
Come read Part II of Howard’s yesterday’s post with me.
Right here.
On the next line.


Starship Kitchen (Part Two)

Seeing my friend enter, restaurant staff faces brightened. They said his name and greeted him hands outstretched. There is little that compares to being known as one in the party of he who is esteemed, however parochially that condition may be defined. And there is nothing strictly parochial about the most fundamental of affinities: true friendship. Not only were we glad to be in a literally world-famous restaurant, about to be seated to dine. We were glad to be in the select company of a friend recognized in a famous venue as “one of us.” Moreover, I was glad, petty as it was at bottom, that all this greatness was not for a single centavo to be at my expense. We were invited as Phil’s guests.

He was paid semi-handsomely for his exertions on the part of the turkey growers, as well as other clients. A significant part of his emolument was a personal expense account, on the one hand potentially taxable as income, on the other, amounting to such a munificent sum annually that strategically his bosses put him in the position of using it up, according to that poetic bit of doggerel philosophy, “use it or lose it.” So that night, he was showing an important IBM executive and her husband his appreciation in the form of a very nice dinner. And he simply refused my participation.

There was another remarkable occurrence, long before food began appearing systematically and with a certain arcane periodicity at the table; clearly not as a dish was ready, and clearly not some rigid mechanical interval. Linda had ordered the vegetarian “Degustation,” which is what fancy places such as this called what has become the prosaic “tasting menu” (and more on that phrase later), while I had the default omnivore’s portions. Not at all alike, each course was, nevertheless, perfectly in sync with all components. But that memorable presence I alluded to was not substantive and plated, so much as maternal. No other than Charlie Trotter’s mother appeared at our table, warm, congenial, welcoming, with an aura that softened the somewhat austere ambiance of the decor.

Not tall. Not short. Not thin. Not heavy. Neither overtly stylish, and by no means haute couture, but appealing and modest, understated while at the same time very present. Her smile was genuine. Her hair, grey, was genuine. Her loving praise of her son’s cooking was genuine.

She seemed genuinely pleased we were there to partake of her son’s handiwork – more than that, of course, it was universally accorded to be overall the artisanship of food as attained by genius, with or without a mother’s validation. We were promised an evening of superlative wining and dining, but what became memorable in larger part, at least for me, was this note of grace and warmth. And all afforded by the simple gesture of having the chef’s mother glide around the room putting every guest at ease and in a positive frame of mind. It was singular, and in my experience, it has remained as much. Nothing speaks of being welcoming than to make people sincerely welcome.

By this point in my life I have eaten in thousands of establishments in North America and Europe. And surely the mother of more than one restaurateur or cook was somewhere in the vicinity, though not, to my perception, in strong evidence. None, other than Mrs. Trotter, ever introduced herself or otherwise made her presence known. I remember the meal that night most generally as overall a classic display of haute cuisine, brilliantly prepared and plated and presented with a level of service to match. But no one dish was so singular as to distinguish itself or the evening – to make it memorable as only a unique detail can render one’s clear recollection – as much as the presence of that pleasant woman of, shall I say, advanced middle age, gracefully introducing herself, announcing her preparedness to answer any question about the menu, or her son, and offering her assistance with meeting any reasonable need.

In case you haven’t picked up my gist, and an appalling lack of testimony about the menu, or the food it proferred, or the wine, or any of the no doubt fine details of smoothly functioning service, let me be clear. I frankly remember almost none of it.

I know we had, as I mentioned, the two menus on offer, one for omnivores and an alternative for vegetarians. I know there were eight courses – or was it ten – including the desserts, which I remember least of all. Not to suggest that the food we were given was not superb. I’ll stake my unsupported belief in it to say that it was. I just remember none of it.

The fault is no doubt mine. It takes quite a bit for me to remember specific dishes I’ve had, especially in venues I’d never been to before and to which I have never returned. And returning by now, for sure, would be impossible, because Chef Charlie died in 2013, of somewhat indeterminate causes given the vagueness of the reporting about the autopsy performed on him, aside from drugs or alcohol or foul play being ruled out, as well as the dismissal of any chance of a notorious rumored burst aneurysm on his brain.

His brilliance lives after him by lingering reputation, and more substantially in the form of several enduring cookery books. The one I prefer is the one he wrote about cooking at home, called straightforwardly enough, *Charlie Trotter Cooks at Home*. Though the more defensible landmarks of his are a series of genre cookery books: one devoted to Seafood, one to Vegetables, one to Meat and Game, and, of course, one to Desserts. The more compendious general subject of his innovative way with classic dishes and the freshest ingredients, and titled simple, like the restaurant was, *Charlie Trotter’s* is still in print, in hardcover, after 24 years on the market, and five years after his death.

They all are enlivened with a quiet authority and assuredness about the food. Trotter was, as I have noted, known to be a perfectionist. He had a sure hand with the cooking, and a sure hand about how things should look on the plate, and how to taste once they arrived at ground zero, the diner’s palate. But getting there, for him, required the utmost care and preparedness.

Nowhere was this more evident at his restaurant than in the place that became the tableau and focus of what clear memories I had of that memorable dining experience. Not, as I have confessed, for the food, an evanescent collection of evidence in any event. And not even for that, I’ll admit, second-most memorable aspect of that evening, the engaging and warm presence of his mom – another deft touch on his part, accepting and also requiring her presence. A softening perhaps of the hard edge of his perfectionism and precisionism.

No, the most memorable part of the night came about with an invitation to tour the scene of the sorcery practiced every night in the fulfillment of ten measured courses of food. We were asked if we’d like to see the kitchen, and before anyone could say anything, I responded with an emphatic yes.

Entering was what I would have imagined it to have been like to enter the control room of a submarine in silent running, or given the amount of lighr and the sleekness of the overall design, it brought another kind of ship to mind. Something from the future, a starship’s bridge, with fewer seats and fewer dials and many hands on deck in immaculate whites.

What was most striking though was the silent operation. Sotto voce conversations; brief ones at that. No shouting. No scurrying. No wasted motion, though with all deliberate speed.

There was spotless stainless steel everywhere. Every station was well-lit. Every station was immaculate, even as they prepared meals for a dining room still full of patrons. Overall, the room was so quiet, I could hear the small printer that spit out short snippets quickly shorn from the lip of the machine and perused by a man, also in white, standing alone at the center of all the activity at the stations surrounding his post. The chef de cuisine.

He occasionally issued terse low-voiced commands to one cook here, or the garde manger there. It was more like he was coordinating a precise intensive operation, meant to save lives and not merely plate courses for some very indulged guests.

The air of calm and the steady intense intuitive sense I had of complete control under severe pressure never broke. As studiously as we observed the staff, no one changed stride, looked up or appeared interrupted. Discipline and order ruled, and as I say, proved far more impressive than the food. The fare had been exemplary, but the production of it – in a sense even more evanescent, because it existed only in time, possessed no mass or volume, but simply happened and was done. Altogether it was as much an unintended performance as a display of ingrained professionalism – yet repeated reliably and flawlessly six days a week.

I’ve had many great meals, and yet so few stand out. Usually the memorable dishes were individual; a scattered constellation of a great main course here, an unforgettable starter there. But only one kitchen operation stands out, akin to a great concert performance by a renowned orchestra start to finish, every movement perfection.

It’s possible, I suppose, for a particular dish to be so good it defies capture in the mind of anyone but the most practiced and refined connoisseur. I would never claim to be that, and I am prepared to be judged as one not capable of appreciating what appeared on the plates of a Charlie Trotter meal. And that’s the reason I suffer the anomaly of remembering a great meal, but being incapable of describing none of it from *amuse bouch*e to the final sweet nothing of a *mignardise*.

But I have also seen many kitchens in full array during a meal, and there is still only the one I will never forget.

Howard Dinin